Are we having fun yet? Testing the effects of imagery use on the affective and enjoyment responses to acute moderate exercise


Stanley, D.M. and Cumming, J. (2010) Are we having fun yet? Testing the effects of imagery use on the affective and enjoyment responses to acute moderate exercise. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, volume 11 (6): 582-590


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Abstract

Objectives The present study investigated whether using imagery during acute moderate exercise evokes more positive affective and enjoyment responses than exercising without an assigned strategy. Design Laboratory experiment. Methods Participants (N = 88, mean age = 19.81 years) were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 conditions (enjoyment imagery, energy imagery, technique imagery, or exercise alone). Affect was measured before, during, and after 20 min of moderate intensity (50% of Heart Rate Reserve) cycle ergometry. A single-item measure of enjoyment was developed for use during exercise. Results Enjoyment and energy imagery brought about significant increases in valence from pre- to postexercise, and significantly higher valence during exercise than exercise alone. All 3 imagery groups reported significant increases in revitalization from pre- to postexercise, and higher enjoyment during exercise than exercise controls. Conclusions The findings indicate that imagery use may enhance affective and enjoyment responses to exercise.



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Item TypeArticle
TitleAre we having fun yet? Testing the effects of imagery use on the affective and enjoyment responses to acute moderate exercise
Authors Stanley, D.M.
Cumming, J.
Uncontrolled Keywordsimagery, exercise, affective response
Departments Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences/Sport and Exercise Science
Additional InformationThe full text of this item is not available from the repository. Please note Dr Stanley was working at the University of Birmingham at the time of publication.
Identifiers
DOI10.1016/j.psychsport.2010.06.010
ISSN1469-0292
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Deposited on 23-Nov-2012 in Research - Coventry.
Last modified on 16-Sep-2016

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